Associated Faculty

Karen Alter

 

Karen Alter's current research investigates how the proliferation of international legal mechanisms is changing international relations. Her book in progress charts and analyzes the trend of creating and using international courts. International Courts in International Politics: Four Judicial Roles and Their Implications for International Politics will provide a framework for comparing and understanding the twenty existing international courts in operation.

Alter is author of: Establishing the Supremacy of European Law: The Making of an International Rule of Law in Europe. (Oxford University Press, 2001), and twenty articles and book chapters on international legal systems. See the research page for her current and past manuscripts.

Professor Alter teaches courses on international law, international organizations, ethics in international affairs, and the international politics of human rights at both the graduate and undergraduate levels.

Alter has been a German Marshall Fund Fellow, a Howard Foundation research fellow and an Emile Noel scholar at Harvard Law School. Her research has also been supported by the DAAD and France’s Chateaubriand fellowship. She has been a visiting scholar at the American Bar Foundation, Northwestern University’s School of Law, Harvard University's Center for European Studies, Institute d’Etudes Politiques, the Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Auswartiges Politik, Universität Bremen, and Seikei University. Fluent in Italian, French and German, Alter serves on the editorial board of European Union Politics and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

 

John Comaroff

 

John L. Comaroff is the Harold H. Swift Distinguished Service Professor of Anthropology at the University of Chicago and a Research Professor of the American Bar Foundation. His current work is on crime, violence, and cultural justice in post-apartheid South Africa. It investigates not just the "problem" of disorder in a particular place at a particular time, but also the nature of the postcolonial nation-state sui generis. His earlier work has covered issues in legal and political anthropology; the anthropology of colonialism, postcolonialism, and modernity; and historical anthropology. Among his books, many coauthored or coedited with Jean Comaroff, are the two-volume Of Revelation and Revolution (University of Chicago Press, 1991) and Civil Society and the Political Imagination in Africa (University of Chicago Press, 1999).

 

William J. Davey

 

William J. Davey is the Guy Raymond Jones Chair at the College of Law, where he has taught courses in international trade law, European Union law, international business transactions, and corporate/securities law since 1984. Professor Davey held the Edwin M. Adams Professorship prior to being named the Guy Raymond Jones Chair. Since its founding in 2001, he has been on the faculty of the Masters Program in International Law and Economics at University of Berne in Switzerland and is a Faculty Associate of the Institute of International Economic Law at Georgetown Law Center. He has also taught at the Academy of International Economic Law and Dispute Settlement in Geneva and the Academy of International Trade law in Macau and was Jean Monnet Professor at the University of Bielefeld in Germany in 1994.

After graduating from law school, Professor Davey served as a law clerk to Judge J. Edward Lumbard at the U.S. Court of Appeals, New York, and Justice Potter Stewart of the U.S. Supreme Court. He then worked in Brussels and New York for the law firm of Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton. From 1995-99, he was on leave from the College and served as the Director of the Legal Affairs Division of the World Trade Organization. Since leaving the WTO he has served on WTO arbitral panels in respect of international trade disputes between Canada and Brazil, the European Union and Korea, and the European Union and the United States.

In 2004, Professor Davey received the Distinguished Faculty Award for International Achievement, the highest award bestowed upon a University of Illinois faculty member for scholarship and service within the international community.

Professor Davey is the author of Legal Problems of International Economic Relations (fourth edition 2002, with Jackson & Sykes), European Community Law (second edition 2002, with Bermann, Goebel & Fox), Pine & Swine: Canada-United States Trade Dispute Settlement (1996), and Handbook of WTO/GATT Dispute Settlement (1991-2000, with Pescatore & Lowenfeld), as well as many articles on various international trade law issues. He is a member of the American Law Institute and serves on the International Trade Committee of the International Law Association.

Professor Davey is Associate Editor of The Journal of International Economic Law (Oxford) and also serves on the Board of Advisors for The Columbia Journal of European Law and the Faculty Editorial Board of the Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies. He is Advisor to the Asian WTO Research Network and on the Board of Advisers of the Project on Dispute Settlement in International Trade, Investment and Intellectual Property of UNCTAD (the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development).

 

Matthew W. Finkin

 

Professor Finkin, the Albert J. Harno and Edward W. Cleary Chair in Law, teaches courses in labor and employment law and directs the College of Law’s Program in Comparative Labor and Employment Law and Policy. He has taught in the law schools of Southern Methodist University, Duke University, and the University of Michigan. He has been a Fulbright Professor at Münster University, a German Marshall Fund Lecturer at Konstanz University, and is a recipient of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation’s Research Award for internationally acknowledged achievements in the field of labor law. Professor Finkin is the author, editor, or co-editor of eight books, including the leading single volume treatise on labor law, Basic Text on Labor Law (2d ed. 2004) with Robert A. Gorman, the leading law school casebook, Labor Law (with Archibald Cox, Derek Bok and Robert Gorman), now in its 14th edition; Introduction to German Law (with Werner Ebke; Kluwer International, 1996); Privacy in Employment Law (BNA, 2nd ed., 2003); and the award-winning The Case for Tenure (Cornell, 1996). He has also authored an extensive body of scholarly periodical publications in labor and employment law, higher education law, and comparative law. In 1997, Professor Finkin assumed the General Editorship of the Comparative Labor Law & Policy Journal. He also serves as Senior Editor of the Bureau of National Affairs Series, International Labor & Employment Laws, as a member of the Commerce Clearing House’s Panel of Labor Law Experts, and on the editorial boards of several journals. In 2004, he was elected as a Fellow of the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers.Over his career, Professor Finkin has lectured widely in the United States, Asia, and Europe, and is active as a labor arbitrator. He has served the American Association of University Professors as General Counsel (1976-78) and as Chairman of its Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure (1980-90). He is a member of the Governing Board of the Institute for Labor Law and Labor Relations in the European Community in Trier, Germany.

 

Bryant Garth

 

Beginning his tenure as Dean at Southwestern in Fall 2005, Bryant G. Garth brings the perspective of an internationally recognized scholar, law professor and former dean. "It is an exciting time," he says, "to be in the midst of helping law students prepare for and build fulfilling, successful careers that best serve the public interest."

Proficient in four foreign languages, Dean Garth was editor-in-chief of the Stanford Journal Of International Studies and went on to serve as a judicial clerk to Judge Robert Peckham of the Federal District Court, Northern District of California. In 1979, he joined the faculty of Indiana University School of Law, Bloomington, where he taught civil procedure, legal profession, international and comparative law and human rights, and served as Dean from 1986 to 1990.

Dean Garth was appointed in 1990 as the Director of the American Bar Foundation (ABF), the independent nonprofit research center established by the ABA for the empirical study of law, legal institutions and legal processes. Under his guidance over the next 14 years, the Foundation became a preeminent resource for lawyers, scholars, legal educators, and policy makers throughout the world. The author or co-author of more than 16 books and 75 articles, Dean Garth\'s research focus has been on the legal profession, dispute resolution, globalization and the rule of law. Drawing on this expertise, he has served as a consultant to such entities as the World Bank, the U.S. Agency for International Development and major philanthropic foundations. In recent years, Dean Garth has addressed more than 100 forums across the U.S. as well as more than a dozen foreign countries. He has held numerous leadership positions within the ABA and the Association of American Law Schools, currently chairing the advisory board of the Law School Survey of Student Engagement and serving on the executive coordinating committee of the pioneering "After the J.D." study of lawyer careers. According to Dean Garth, "Information from these and other studies will help us take the lead in designing innovative curricula and programs that best suit our students\' needs."

 

James Heckman

 

James Heckman received his B.A. in mathematics from Colorado College in 1965 and his Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University in 1971. He is currently the Henry Schultz Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago where he has served since 1973 and where he directs the Economics Research Center and the Center for Social Program Evaluation at the Harris School. He is also the Professor of Science and Society in University College Dublin. He is also a Research Professor at the American Bar Foundation. Heckman's work has been devoted to the development of a scientific basis for economic policy evaluation, with special emphasis on models of individuals and disaggregated groups, and to the problems and possibilities created by heterogeneity, diversity, and unobserved counterfactual states. In the early 1990s, his pioneering research on the outcomes of people who obtain the GED certificate received national attention. His findings, which questioned the alleged benefits of the degree, spurred debates across the country on the merits of obtaining the certificate. His recent research focuses on human development and lifecycle skill formation, with a special emphasis on the economics of early childhood. His research has given policymakers important new insights into such areas as education, job-training programs, minimum-wage legislation, anti-discrimination law and civil rights.

Heckman has published over 200 articles and several books. His most recent books include: Inequality in America: What Role for Human Capital Policy? (with Alan Krueger) and Evaluating Human Capital Policy, and Law and Employment: Lessons From Latin America and the Caribbean (with C. Pages).

Heckman has received numerous awards for his work, including the John Bates Clark Award of the American Economic Association in 1983, the 2000 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (with Daniel McFadden), the 2005 and 2007 Dennis Aigner Award for Applied Econometrics from the Journal of Econometrics, the 2007 Theodore W. Schultz Award from the American Agricultural Economics Association, the 2005 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Achievement in Labor Economics, and the 2005 Ulysses Medal from the University College Dublin. He is currently Associate Editor of the Journal of Labor Economics. He is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, the Society of Labor Economics, and the American Statistical Association.

 

Carol Heimer

 

Professor; Ph.D. University of Chicago 1981. Areas of interest include organizations, sociology of law, medical sociology. Heimer is also a Research Professor at the American Bar Foundation. She has taught at the University of Arizona and had research appointments at Australian National University (Law Program in the Institute for Advanced Study), the Institute for Industrial Economics in Norway, and Stanford University. Her research has focused on the intersection of normative systems, on organizations, and on risk and uncertainty. She (together with Lisa Staffen) has recently published For the Sake of the Children (University of Chicago Press, 1998),a book on the social organization of responsibility in infant intensive care units. Other publications include Reactive Risk and Rational Action (University of California Press, a study of how insurers think about and manage risks and how those strategies are represented in other areas of social life), Organization Theory and Project Management (Norwegian University Press, a collection of papers with Arthur Stinchcombe), and papers on medical social workers (with Mitchell Stevens), on the sociology of risk, on institutional competitions inside organizations, and on universalism and particularism. Heimer is currently working on a book extending the arguments of her work on the social organization of responsibility in infant intensive care to other settings.

 

Larry E. Ribstein

 

Professor Larry E. Ribstein is the Mildred Van Voorhis Jones Chair in Law. Professor Ribstein is the author of leading treatises on limited liability companies (Ribstein & Keatinge on Limited Liability Companies), partnership law (Bromberg & Ribstein on Partnerships) and limited liability partnerships (Bromberg & Ribstein on LLPs), as well as two business associations casebooks (Unincorporated Business Entities and Ribstein & Letsou, Business Associations).

Professor Ribstein is the co-author, with Henry Butler, of The Sarbanes-Oxley Debacle and The Constitution and the Corporation. From 1998-2001 he was co-editor of the Supreme Court Economic Review.

Ribstein has written or co-authored approximately 120 articles on subjects including corporate, securities and partnership law, constitutional law, bankruptcy, film, the internet, family law, professional ethics and licensing, uniform laws, choice of law and jurisdictional competition.

His articles during the past year have focused on Sarbanes-Oxley, corporate social responsibility, fiduciary duties in partnerships, fiduciary duties of corporate directors, the history of corporate and partnership law, the implications of behavioral finance for securities regulation, journalism and the portrayal of business in film. Ribstein\'s article, Are Partners Fiduciaries? was selected by a vote of corporate and securities laws scholars as one of the best articles of 2005.

 

Richard L. Kaplan

 

Before joining the faculty in 1979, Richard Kaplan practiced law in Houston, Texas. An internationally recognized expert on U.S. taxation and tax policy, he has lectured in these areas on three continents, testified before the U.S. Congress on several occasions, and written innovative course books on income taxation and international taxation.

Professor Kaplan developed one of the first law school courses on elder law, an emerging specialty dealing with the legal implications of extended life, and has served as faculty advisor for the Elder Law Journal since its inception in 1993. He has also been recognized with the Campus Award for Excellence in Graduate and Professional Teaching at the University of Illinois.

Professor Kaplan is a Fellow of the Employee Benefits Research Institute and a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance. He served on a 12-member panel on The Future of the Health Care Labor Force in a Graying Society, chaired by former U.S. Secretary of Labor Lynn Martin. In 2002, he was a delegate to the National Summit on Retirement Savings organized by the U.S. Department of Labor.

 

Patrick Keenan

 

Professor Keenan has research and teaching interests in the areas of International Law, International Human Rights, Globalization, Legal Ethics and Criminal Law.

Professor Keenan joined the College of Law\'s tenure-track faculty in January 2005. His scholarship focuses on the movement and regulation of unwanted activity in a globalized world. He is also interested in issues of access to legal services for the poor. Professor Keenan\'s most recent publication, The New Deterrence: Crime and Policy in the Age of Globalization, appeared in Iowa Law Review (2006). In addition, he has presented other work at Washington University in St. Louis, Stanford, the University of Georgia, Indiana University-Bloomington, as well as internationally.

Professor Keenan is also the founder and director of the College of Law\'s International Human Rights Law Clinic. Students in the Clinic collaborate with lawyers from around the world to represent people who would not otherwise have access to legal assistance. Under Professor Keenan\'s supervision, students have drafted legislation to protect people with HIV/AIDS from discrimination, helped develop a litigation strategy to sue an international organization for the illegal imposition of sanctions, and helped to represent a group of widows seeking compensation for the murders of their husbands.

Professor Keenan has substantial expertise in criminal law and procedure. Before coming to the College of Law, Professor Keenan spent five years litigating death penalty cases in Georgia and Alabama as an attorney with the Southern Center for Human Rights. He is a founding member of the University of Illinois Program in Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure and acts as Co-Director of the Criminal Law and Policy Reading Group at the College of Law. He is also the co-author, with Stephen B. Bright, of Judges and the Politics of Death: Deciding Between the Bill of Rights and the Next Election in Capital Cases, 75 Boston University Law Review 3 (1995), which was cited by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2002 in Republican Party of Minnesota v. White, Chairperson, Minnesota Board Of Judicial Standards.

Professor Keenan received his B.A. magna cum laude from Tufts University, and his J.D. from Yale Law School, where he was an editor of the Yale Journal of International Law. While in law school, he also studied at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University. After law school, he served as law clerk for Judge Myron H. Thompson of the Middle District of Alabama. Before entering law school, he served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

 

Jay P. Kesan

 

Professor Kesan\'s academic interests are in the areas of intellectual property, specifically patent law, and law and technology. He has written extensively (recent publications are on SSRN at http://ssrn.com/author=261086 in the areas of patent law and patent institutions, law and the regulation of cyberspace, intellectual property, and law and economics. Intellectual property, patent law, and regulatory issues in computer software and agricultural biotechnology have been the focus of much of his recent writings.

At the University of Illinois, Professor Kesan holds positions in the College of Law, the Coordinated Science Laboratory, the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, and the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics.

He was a JSPS Invited Fellow and Visiting Associate Professor at the University of Tokyo, Japan and has also served as a Foreign Research Fellow at the Institute of Intellectual Property (IIP) in Tokyo, Japan. He has also served as a Visiting Assistant Professor at Georgetown University Law Center, and as the Jerold Hosier Distinguished Visiting Professor in Intellectual Property at DePaul University. He frequently serves as an invited faculty member at the CASRIP Summer Institute at the University of Washington. Professor Kesan is a Co-Director of the International and Comparative Intellectual Property Law Summer Program sponsored by the University of Illinois College of Law, Oxford University, and the University of Victoria, British Columbia.

He has received numerous, multi-year, research grants for his work in the areas of intellectual property and technology regulation from the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Net Institute, the Coleman Foundation, and the University of Illinois Campus Research Board.

He serves as the faculty Editor-in-Chief of the University of Illinois Journal of Law, Technology and Policy, which published its inaugural issue in Spring 2001. He has also developed an online course on “Legal Issues in Technology Entrepreneurship,” supported by a grant from the Coleman Foundation.

Professor Kesan continues to be professionally active in the areas of patent litigation and technology entrepreneurship. He was appointed by two federal judges to serve as a Special Master in patent litigations, and has served as a technical and legal expert in patent matters. He participated twice in panels at the Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Justice Hearings on the Implications of Competition and Patent Law and Policy. He has also worked with the U.S. Department of Commerce and the U.S. Civilian Research & Development Foundation on their intellectual property protection and technology commercialization activities in the former Soviet Union countries.

He received his J.D. summa cum laude from Georgetown University, where he received several awards including Order of the Coif, and served as Associate Editor of the Georgetown Law Journal. After graduation, he clerked for Judge Patrick E. Higginbotham of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

Prior to attending law school, Jay Kesan—who also holds a Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering—worked as a research scientist at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center in New York. He is a registered patent attorney and practiced at the former firm of Pennie & Edmonds LLP in the areas of patent litigation and patent prosecution. In addition, he has published numerous scientific papers and obtained several patents in the U.S. and abroad.

 

Peter B. Maggs

 

Professor Maggs graduated from both Harvard College and Harvard Law School with honors. After law school, he attended Leningrad State University (now St. Petersburg State University), as a graduate student and later served as an Associate at the Harvard Russian Research Center and as a Research Associate at Harvard Law School.

Considered by many as the foremost United States scholar on Soviet and post-Soviet law, Professor Maggs is a leading expert in the entire body of Russian law. Since 1994, he has served as a consultant for USAID contractors and the World Bank on numerous law reform projects in the former Soviet Union, including legislative drafting and educational projects in Armenia, Belarus, Moldova, Kazakstan, Kyrgystan, Russia, and Ukraine. He has also completed projects on Soviet law for the U.S. Department of State, and served as Director and Legal Reform Specialist for the Rule of Law Consortium in Washington, D.C.

Professor Maggs has four times been a Fulbright Scholar, most recently in Spring 2002 as Fulbright Distinguished Chair at the University of Trento in Italy. He has also been a Guggenheim Fellow, and has co-authored more than 20 books and articles on Russian and Soviet law, American law of unfair trade practices, consumer protection, and computer law. The second edition of The Civil Code of the Russian Federation, which he translated with Alexei Zhiltsov and edited, was recently published in Moscow. In addition, he has been active in international intellectual property law reform, co-authoring Intelektual’naia sobstvennost’ (Intellectual Property), published by Iurist in Moscow (2001). He wrote a chapter entitled, "Russia\'s Writing Requirement under the Convention on Contracts for International Sale of Goods," in the recently published book, "Balancing of Interests Liber Amicorum" by Professor Peter Hay zum 70. Geburtstag (Frankfurt am Main: Verlag Recht und Wirtschaft GmbH, 2005), pp. 279-283.

In 2006, Professor Maggs received the Distinguished Faculty Award for International Achievement, the highest award bestowed upon a University of Illinois faculty member for scholarship and service within the international community.

He is a past member of the Panel of Recommended Arbitrators for the International Commercial Arbitration Court of the Russian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and is a former Chairman of the Committee on Soviet Law for the American Bar Association Section on International Law.

Professor Maggs has served as a Visiting Professor at the George Washington University Law School and is a member of the Board of Advisors for Central and East European Legal Materials. He is a member of the American Law Institute and served on advisory committees for the development of Restatement (Third) of Unfair Competition and for the revision of Articles 2 and 2A of the Uniform Commercial Code.

 

Alberto Palloni

 

Demographer and sociologist Alberto Palloni works on health and mortality, socioeconomic inequality, aging, criminology and statistical and mathematical models for the spread of illnesses.

His current research interests investigate the relationship between early health status and social stratification and inequality and poverty in the United States, determinants of health and mortality disparities among ethnic groups in the United States, families and households in Africa and Latin America, aging and mortality in Latin America and the Caribbean, and the application of mathematical and statistical models to the study of health and mortality determinants, fertility, social stratification, and the spread of disease, in particular for HIV/AIDS.

Palloni is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a National Institutes of Health Merit Scholar, and a past president of the Population Association of America. He has been a Guggenheim Fellow and a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in Stanford, Calif.

 

Gregory C. Schaffer

 

Professor Gregory Shaffer is the Wing-Tat Lee Chair of International Law at Loyola University Chicago. He teaches courses in a number of subject areas, including international trade law, international law, European Union law, international business transactions, and a variety of research seminars. He received his BA from Dartmouth College and his JD from Stanford Law School. Prior to joining the faculty in 2006, Professor Shaffer was professor at the University of Wisconsin Law School for ten years, where he directed the University\'s European Union Center and co-directed its Center on World Affairs and the Global Economy. Before that, he practiced law in Paris for over seven years for Coudert Freres and Bredin Prat. Shaffer\'s publications include Defending Interests: Public-Private Partnerships in WTO Litigation (Brookings Institution Press, 2003), Transatlantic Governance in the Global Economy (with Mark Pollack, Rowman & Littlefield 2001), and over forty articles and book chapters on international trade law, global governance, and globalization\'s impact on domestic regulation. His books are available from Amazon.com.

Professor Shaffer\'s work is cross-disciplinary, addressing such topics as public-private networks in international trade litigation; comparative institutional approaches to handling trade-social policy conflicts; and the regulation of data privacy and genetically modified foods. His articles have been published in the Yale Journal of International Law, Harvard Environmental Law Review, Law and Contemporary Problems, Journal of International Economic Law, American Journal of International Law, Columbia Journal of European Law, World Trade Review, European Law Journal, Journal of European Public Policy, and The Washington Quarterly. Among other awards, Professor Shaffer is a recipient of two US National Science Foundation grants for his work on developing country participation in WTO dispute settlement, and on conflicts involving international trade and environmental policies. He has been designated a Visiting Scholar at the American Bar Foundation (2004) and at Columbia Law School (2002), and a Distinguished Visiting Professor at DePaul University College of Law (2003).

 

Thomas S. Ulen

 

Professor Gregory Shaffer is the Wing-Tat Lee Chair of International Law at Loyola University Chicago. He teaches courses in a number of subject areas, including international trade law, international law, European Union law, international business transactions, and a variety of research seminars. He received his BA from Dartmouth College and his JD from Stanford Law School. Prior to joining the faculty in 2006, Professor Shaffer was professor at the University of Wisconsin Law School for ten years, where he directed the University\'s European Union Center and co-directed its Center on World Affairs and the Global Economy. Before that, he practiced law in Paris for over seven years for Coudert Freres and Bredin Prat. Shaffer\'s publications include Defending Interests: Public-Private Partnerships in WTO Litigation (Brookings Institution Press, 2003), Transatlantic Governance in the Global Economy (with Mark Pollack, Rowman & Littlefield 2001), and over forty articles and book chapters on international trade law, global governance, and globalization\'s impact on domestic regulation. His books are available from Amazon.com.

Professor Shaffer\'s work is cross-disciplinary, addressing such topics as public-private networks in international trade litigation; comparative institutional approaches to handling trade-social policy conflicts; and the regulation of data privacy and genetically modified foods. His articles have been published in the Yale Journal of International Law, Harvard Environmental Law Review, Law and Contemporary Problems, Journal of International Economic Law, American Journal of International Law, Columbia Journal of European Law, World Trade Review, European Law Journal, Journal of European Public Policy, and The Washington Quarterly. Among other awards, Professor Shaffer is a recipient of two US National Science Foundation grants for his work on developing country participation in WTO dispute settlement, and on conflicts involving international trade and environmental policies. He has been designated a Visiting Scholar at the American Bar Foundation (2004) and at Columbia Law School (2002), and a Distinguished Visiting Professor at DePaul University College of Law (2003).

 

Cynthia A. Williams

 

Professor Williams graduated cum laude from New York University School of Law where she was an articles editor of the New York University Law Review, a Root-Tilden Public Interest Scholar, and a member of Order of the Coif. While at NYU, she also earned several American Jurisprudence Awards. After graduation, Professor Williams clerked for Judge Milton L. Schwartz, Jr. of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California. She then joined the New York office of Cravath, Swaine & Moore as a litigation associate, where she primarily handled cases involving securities, mergers and acquisitions, and antitrust issues, and a number of civil rights and constitutional law cases for the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights, including litigation in the United States Supreme Court.

Professor Williams has been a Visiting Professor at Fordham University School of Law and a Visiting Associate Professor and Research Fellow at the Georgetown-Sloan Project on Business Institutions at Georgetown University Law Center, and most recently a Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Cambridge Centre for Business Research. At the University of Illinois, Williams was a Fellow in the Interdisciplinary Program for the Study of Cultural Values and Ethics.

Professor Williams writes in the areas of securities law and corporate law, with a particular emphasis on the corporate social relationship. Her Harvard Law Review article, "The Securities and Exchange Commission and Corporate Social Transparency", was the lead article reprinted in the Securities Law Review 2000, and was recognized by Corporate Practice Commentator as one of the 10 best corporate or securities articles published in 1999.

Professor Williams\' recent work examining the corporate social responsibility trend in global business is based on a number of interdisciplinary collaborations, involving anthropology (with Prof. John Conley), business (with Prof. Ruth Aguilera), organizational psychology (with Prof. Deborah Rupp) and law. These collaborations have led to publications in the Academy of Management Review (forthcoming); the Corporate Governance International Review; the Georgetown Law Review; the Journal of Corporation Law; the Journal of Organizational Behavior; Oxford University Press (forthcoming) and the international law journals at Cornell University and New York University.

Prof. Williams does research in comparative corporate governance as well, and with Prof. John Conley argues for a re-examination of the theory of the "Anglo-American corporate system," suggesting instead that the UK and the US have distinct corporate governance systems that are becoming increasingly different in light of the greater importance given to long-term social and environmental issues among institutional investors in the UK versus the US. See Williams & Conley, An Emerging Third Way? The Erosion of the Anglo-American Shareholder Value Construct, 38 Cornell Int’l L. J. 493 (2005). In April, 2006, Prof. Williams hosted an international conference in Chicago based on this work, entitled "Capital Markets and Corporate Governance: Pressures to Think Short-Term?" Participants included academics from England and the United States, and market participants such as institutional investors, pension funds, and asset managers from both countries.

Prof. Williams is also a casebook author with Prof. Gordon Smith of the University of Wisconsin, publishing a casebook entitled Business Organizations: Cases, Problems, and Case Studies with Aspen Press in 2004.

 

Barry Abrams

 

Center Person Content

 

Andrew P. Morriss

 

 

Andrew P. Morriss is the inaugural H. Ross and Helen Workman Professor of Law & Professor of Business. He is also a Research Fellow of the NYU Center for Labor and Employment Law, a Senior Fellow at the Property & Environment Research Center, Bozeman, Montana; a Senior Scholar at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University; and a regular visiting professor at Universidad Francisco Marroquín, in Guatemala. Prior to coming to the University of Illinois, he served as Galen J. Roush Professor of Business Law and Regulation at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, where he was also associate dean from 2000 to 2003.

He received his A.B. degree from Princeton University, his J.D. and a masters degree in public affairs from The University of Texas at Austin, and his Ph.D. (Economics) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After law school he clerked for U.S. District Judge Barefoot Sanders in the Northern District of Texas and worked for two years at Texas Rural Legal Aid in Hereford and Plainview, Texas.

Professor Morriss is the author or coauthor of more than forty book chapters and scholarly articles, including Signaling and Precedent in Federal District Court Opinions (with Michael Heise and Gregory Sisk) 13 Supreme Court Economic Review 63-98 (2005); Defining What to Regulate: Silica & the Problem of Regulatory Categorization (with Susan E. Dudley), Administrative Law Review (forthcoming 2006); and The Public-Private Security Partnership: Counterterrorism Considerations for Employers in a Post-9/11 World, in Work Place Privacy Here and Abroad: Proceedings of the New York University 58th Annual Conference on Labor (Kluwer 2006). He is the co-editor of Cross-Border Human Resources, Labor and Employment Issues: Proceedings of the New York University 54th Annual Conference on Labor (Samuel Estreicher and Andrew Morriss, eds.) (Kluwer 2004); Property Stories (Gerald Korngold and Andrew Morriss, eds.) (Foundation Press, 2004); and The Common Law and the Environment (Roger Meiners and Andrew Morriss, eds.) (Rowman & Littlefield, 2000). He recently released the book, Regulation by Litigation (with Bruce Yandle and Andrew Dorchak) from Yale University Press. He also regularly writes for The Freeman: Ideas on Liberty and Books & Culture: A Christian Review.

Professor Morriss was recently named one of the Reporters for the Restatement of Employment Law by the American Law Institute (ALI). ALI, through a careful and deliberative process, drafts and then publishes various Restatements of the Law, model codes, and legal studies to promote the clarification and simplification of the law and its better adaptation to social needs, to secure the better administration of justice, and to encourage and carry on scholarly and scientific legal work. Professor Morriss was also selected as a Senior Fellow for the Houston-based Institute for Energy Research (IER). IER conducts historical research and evaluates public policies in the oil, gas, coal, and electricity markets. He was also recently named a Reporter for the Restatement of Employment Law by the American Law Institute. He was also named to the Financial Markets Working Group at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University.

Professor Morriss recently authored the Illinois' Energy Outlook, a thorough examination of the energy situation in the state of Illinois. His chapter is contained in the 2008 edition of The Illinois Report, an extensive survey of statewide issues intended to serve as an information aide for Illinois' political leaders. The Illinois Report is produced by the Institute of Government and Public Affairs.